Venice here we come part 7

ian ball
October 12, 2017

After a good nights sleep, we left Plitvice Lakes and hit the roads to Venice travelling through the countryside that surrounds Plitvice Lakes, nearly every farm has its own small stole outside selling produce mainly honey it is well worth stopping off and stocking up on Pooh bears favourite food.

We soon hit the Croatian coastline and followed it North it is a stunning drive with plenty of little campsites next to the beach many noted for a visit in the future.

As we left Croatia we re-entered Slovenia for the last time before entering Italy which according to Liam is the best country to visit (he does live there) and I have to admit it wasn’t going to let us down.

We chugged on with our sights set on  Camping Rialto , driving in Italy towards Venice is a pleasurable experience with the marsh/swap on the left and vast farmlands to the right.

We arrived and set up camp and decided to catch the bus to Venice, the bus stop is located right outside the campsite and you can buy tickets at the reception.

This was mine and Lily’s first visit to Venice and I have to say wow it’s stunning with plenty to see around every corner, busy but well worth it.

The Republic of Venice was a major financial and maritime power during the Middle Ages and Renaissance, and a staging area for the Crusades and the Battle of Lepanto, as well as a very important centre of commerce (especially silk, grain, and spice) and art in the 13th century up to the end of the 17th century. The City State of Venice is considered to have been the first real international financial centre which gradually emerged from the 9th century to its peak in the 14th century. This made Venice a wealthy city throughout most of its history.

It is also known for its several important artistic movements, especially the Renaissance period. After the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Republic was annexed by the Austrian Empire, until it became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1866, following a referendum held as a result of the Third Italian War of Independence. Venice has played an important role in the history of symphonic and operatic music, and it is the birthplace of Antonio Vivaldi.Venice has been ranked the most beautiful city in the world as of 2016.The city is facing some major challenges, however, including financial difficulties, erosion, pollution, subsidence and an excessive number of tourists in peak periods.

Venice is built on an archipelago of 118 islands formed by 177 canals in a shallow lagoon, connected by 409 bridges. In the old centre, the canals serve the function of roads, and almost every form of transport is on water or on foot. In the 19th century, a causeway to the mainland brought the Venezia Santa Lucia railway station to Venice, and the Ponte della Libertà road causeway and parking facilities (in Tronchetto island and in piazzale Roma) were built during the 20th century. Beyond the road and rail land entrances at the northern edge of the city, transportation within the city remains (as it was in centuries past) entirely on water or on foot. Venice is Europe’s largest urban car-free area. Venice is unique in Europe, in having remained a sizeable functioning city in the 21st century entirely without motorcars or trucks.

We soon got to our destination after a long walk and there it sat in front of us Piazza San Marco all I could think of was how close the Assassin’s Creed game had depicted it, what a place unbelievable, the beauty is out of this world.

Assassin’s Creed


What can I say about Venice……It’s beautiful but it’s so expensive for example a gondola ride is not far short of a £100 a glass of wine is an eye-watering £12 the saving grace is a dirty Mac’s is the same price all over the world.

Don’t let the cost of this place put you off it is well worth a visit.

It even may start sinking as you take your photos

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